8″ TQ Blocks

Just Call Me “Chef”

MBS-featured-button-2014I’ve been cooking up a couple of patterns using Moda fabric Layer Cakes® recently. The first pattern, pictured above,  is called “Big Sky”, and it is available now at the Moda Bake Shop blog.

The quilt uses a simple block, made of sixteen half-square-triangles (HSTs). When I learned that the block is called “Anna’s Choice”, I had to add it to my repertoire.

The blocks in the “Big Sky” quilt are 16″ square. Just for kicks, I decided to play around with it a bit, using 2.5″ HSTs made from 6.5″ squares.

img_1629-e1502076732376.jpgInstead of using just two colors in the block, as I did in “Big Sky”, I used one dark square, one medium square, and two light squares. I won’t go through the process of making the HSTs here, since I’ve done that in a previous post.

Pairing the dark and medium squares with the light squares gave me eight 2.5″ light/medium HSTS and eight 2.5″ light/dark HSTs.

Ready to play? Here are a dozen possible combinations of these squares. Each block would be 8″ x 8″ finished:

So there are at least twelve possible variations for the parts and pieces of the “Anna’s Choice” block. Now, the choice is yours. Enjoy!

 

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Categories: 8" TQ Blocks, HST's, Moda Bake Shop, Thrifty Quilter Blocks & Patterns, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Now I KNOW It’s Spring…

My sinuses tell me that the weather around here has finally caught up with the calendar. It is indeed spring, and of course, in the end, the beauty of it outweighs a stuffy head and sore throat. So enough with feeling sorry for myself.

Let’s “plant” some Morning Glory blocks!

This block uses the same “split rectangle” units we used in last week’s Crocus block. However, this time we’re going to use the Split Recs® tool from Studio 180 Design to make the units. Let’s get started.

TQ pieces for the Morning Glory block

TQ pieces for the Morning Glory block

For one Morning Glory block you will need:

Print for flower petals (orange): two 3.5″ x 6.5″ rectangles

Print for flower center: one 2.5″ square

Green for leaves: two 3.5″ x 6.5″ rectangles and one 3.5″ square

Background (off-white): Two 3.5″ x 6.5″ rectangles, one 3.5″ square and five 2.5″ squares.

Step 1a

Step 1a

Step 1a- We need to cut the half-rectangle triangles we need for the petal and leaf units. Layer the two background rectangles wrong-sides-together. Use the markings for a 2″ x 4″ finished unit to cut a triangle from one end of the rectangles.

Step 1b

Step 1b

Rotate what’s left of the rectangles and cut another pair of triangles from the  opposite corner. Because you had your rectangles layered wrong-sides together, you now have two pairs of mirror-image triangles.

Step 2- Repeat steps 1a and 1b with the green rectangles. You will only need one pair of mirror-image triangles for this block. Set the other pair aside for another block.

Step 3a

Step 3a

Step 3a- Sew a background triangle to a green triangle. They are a little larger than they need to be, so we use the other end of the Split Recs® tool to trim them down.

Lay the tool on the unit so that the line that reads 2″ x 4″ finished unit lines up with the diagonal seam. trim the right and top edges.

Step 3b

Step 3b

Rotate the unit, re-align the diagonal line and trim the right and top edges. Your unit is now a perfect 2.5″ x 4.5″.

Step 3c

Step 3c

The diagonal seam on the other unit will slant in the opposite direction.

Step 4a

Step 4a

Step 4- Layer the two print rectangles wrong-sides together and cut a pair of triangles from one end. Cut a 2.5″ square from the other end of the rectangles. You will only need one of these 2.5″ squares for this block. You can use the other for the flower center in another block, or toss it in your bin of 2.5″ TQ squares.

Use the print triangles and the two remaining background triangles to make a pair of split rectangle units, as in step 3.

Step 5

Step 5

Step 5- It’s time to make the Morning Glory “blossom”. Sew the 2.5″ print square and three of the 2.5″ background squares into a 4-patch, then lay out with the split rectangles and print square as shown, and sew the blossom unit together.

Step 6- Oops. I forgot to photograph this one. Use the 3.5″ green and background squares to make two 2.5″ half-square triangles (HSTs). If you don’t know how to do this, click HERE for another blog post that shows you how. It’s Step 1 in that block.

Step 7a

Step 7a

Step 7- Lay out the green split rectangle units, the HST and the remaining two 2.5″ background squares as shown. Sew the background squares to the ends of the split rectangles, and sew the HST to the green end of one of the split rectangles. Sew the leaf units to the blossom unit to complete your Morning Glory block.

Vol11-blog-tour-coming-socialmedia_66016My next planned blog post will be on day 1 of the Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks Volume 11 blog tour. I’m proud to be a part of this latest edition. I think you’ll enjoy my “Telstar” block and what I’ve been able to do with it. You’ll also have a chance to win a free copy of the publication!

Categories: 8" TQ Blocks, Split Rects (Studio 180 Designs), The Thrifty Quilter System, Thrifty Quilter Blocks & Patterns | Leave a comment

It’s Spring!

I’ve yet to see a robin, but the grass is greening up and while they haven’t bloomed, my tulips have broken ground. My rancher friends are up at all hours dealing with newborn calves and lambs. Best of all, the days are warm enough that you don’t mind being outside for more than a few minutes. It’s SPRING in northern Montana!

To celebrate, I have a fun little crocus block for you.

To make this 8″ block, you will need the following Thrifty Quilter pieces:

Pieces for one crocus block

Pieces for one crocus block

Green: two 2.5″ x 4.5″ rectangles

Light Purple: two 2.5″ squares and two 2.5″ x 4.5″ rectangles

White: six 2.5″ squares and four 2.5″ x 4.5″ rectangles

To construct this block, we need to make 2.5″ x 4.5″ “split rectangles”. Because we are starting with our pre-cut 2.5″ x 4.5″ rectangles, this is going to be a little tricky, and you will find that the diagonal seam line will not go into the corner of the finished piece. If you’re compulsive about accuracy, this may drive you a little crazy, but it’s okay. Trust me.

Step 1a

Step 1a

Layer your two print rectangles wrong sides together, so you will be cutting mirror-image pieces. Lay your ruler diagonally on the fabric so that the 1/4″ line is on the upper left and lower right corners as shown.

Step 1b

Step 1b

Make your cut. Discard the cutaway triangle. Repeat with the green and white rectangles.

Step 1c

Step 1c

Pair a white piece with each print piece and place them right sides together as shown. matching the original corners and aligning the bias edges. Your seam line should run from corner to corner.

Step 1d

Step 1d

Press open and you should have 2.5″ x 4.5″ rectangles again.

Step 2a

Step 2a

Make a 4-patch with one 2.5″ print square and three 2.5″ white squares.

Now you can lay out all of the pieces for the crocus “blossom” as shown and sew them together.

Step 2b

Step 2b

Once the blossom portion is finished, it’s time to add the leaves. Lay out the green split rectangles and the three remaining white 2.5″ squares as shown.

Sew a white square to the narrow green end of one leaf and sew that unit to the side of the blossom unit.

Then sew white squares to both ends of the other leaf and sew that unit on to complete your crocus block.

finished Crocus block

finished Crocus block

Perhaps you can see in the photo that the diagonal purple seam lines wind up about 1/4″ away from the corner of that rectangle. Also, the tips of the green triangles that touch the purple blossom unit are just a bit “flat”. Because it doesn’t affect the outline of the flower, and because it happens consistently in this block, it doesn’t bother me like I was sure it would. If you’re uncomfortable with it, I have another way to make those split rectangles that will solve the problem. Meet me here next week, when we’ll “plant” some morning glories!

joinforblogtour11_200

Oh, and mark your calendar for Tuesday, May 5th when “Seams Like a Plan” will be a stop on Quiltmaker magazine’s 100 Blocks, Vol. 11 blog tour.

Categories: 100 Blocks, 8" TQ Blocks, Quiltmaker Magazine, The Thrifty Quilter System, Thrifty Quilter Blocks & Patterns | Leave a comment

But I Digress…..

One reason I have a lot of unfinished projects cluttering up my studio is that I suffer from ADDD…Attention Deficit Designing Disorder. Too often a project in progress is interrupted by an idea that just flutters into my brain. Most dash off before I can grab a paper and pencil, but now and again one settles in and makes itself at home. This is one of those ideas.

A couple of weeks ago I posted a tutorial for my “Quarter Star” block.

Since then, I have been working on a blog series that should begin next Month. Well, sir, the two ideas collided and formed a new block. I had to stop and whip one up.

I don’t even have a name for it yet, but I like it…a lot…so I’m going to go ahead and share it:

(Put Title Here)

I used 2.5″ and 4.5″ squares and made an 8″ (finished size) block.

For a 12″ block, use 3.5″  and 6.5″ squares.

GE DIGITAL CAMERATo make this block, you will need:

One large square

Eight small white squares

Four sets of three matching small squares

GE DIGITAL CAMERADraw a diagonal line on the back of each of the small white squares. Pair each with a small print square and make four pairs of  half-square triangles (HST’s), using the “stitch and flip” method.

You will have one small square of each color remaining, plus your large square.

GE DIGITAL CAMERALay out all of the parts as shown, so that your HST’s form star points around the large center square.

GE DIGITAL CAMERASew the HST’s into pairs.

GE DIGITAL CAMERANow you can sew the remaining small squares to the ends of the top and bottom star point pairs. Sew the other star point pairs to the large center square.

GE DIGITAL CAMERASew the rows together to complete the block.

Now, what shall I call it?

Please give me your best idea in a comment, below.

 

Categories: 12" TQ Blocks, 8" TQ Blocks, HST's, Scrap Quilts, Thrifty Quilter Blocks & Patterns | 2 Comments

Waste Not…Make More Quilts!

When we make Flying Geese in the Thrifty Quilter system, we use the “stitch and flip” method- two small squares and a rectangle equals one “goose”. Of course, this method leaves us with small “waste” triangles.

You can use those, you know.

Okay, I confess, the trimmed-away triangles from small set geese (2.5″ squares and 2.5″ x 4.5″ rectangles) do wind up in the dog-bed pile in my studio, but recently I made a flock of large set (3.5″ squares and 3.5″ x 6.5″ rectangles) geese, and those trimmed-away triangles are perfect for making 2.5″ half square triangles…HSTs in quilt-speak. Let me show you:

Draw a diagonal line on the back of your 3.5" square, and a second line 1/2" from the first line. Sew on both lines.

Draw a diagonal line on the back of your 3.5″ square, and a second line 1/2″ from the first line. Sew on both lines.

Trim the corner 1/4" from the first line. Press seam open and repeat on the other end of the rectangle.

Trim the corner 1/4″ from the first line. Press seam open and repeat on the other end of the rectangle.

I now have the "goose" for my project, and two HSTs leftover.

I now have the “goose” for my project, and two HSTs that can go into my 2.5″ squares bin.

These HSTs are just a little too big, and need to be trimmed down.

Many square rulers have a 45 degree line that goes into a corner.

Lay your ruler down so that the 45° line is on the diagonal seam. The left and bottom edges of the square extend past the 2.5" lines on your ruler. Trim the right and top edges.

Lay your ruler down so that the 45° line is on the diagonal seam. The left and bottom edges of the square extend past the 2.5″ lines on your ruler. Trim the right and top edges.

Flip the HST around and line the diagonal line on the seam again. This time the left and bottom edges should be right on your 2.5" lines. Again, trim the right and top edges.

Flip the HST around and place the diagonal line on the seam again. This time the left and bottom edges should be right on your 2.5″ lines. Again, trim the right and top edges.

 

 And here are a couple of blocks you can make with these “bonus” HST’s:

1 – “All Points” (8″ block)

For this block you need four pairs of HST's, one 2.5" square that matches each pair, and four white 2.5" squares.

For this block you need four pairs of HST’s, one 2.5″ square that matches each pair, and four white 2.5″ squares.

For each pai of HSts, sew one to a matching square and the other to a white square. Notice the orientation of the diagonal seams in the photo. All of the HSTs must look the same going through your machine.

For each pair of HSTs, sew one to a matching square and the other to a white square. Notice the orientation of the diagonal seams in the photo. All of the HSTs must look the same going through your machine.

Now you can sew those pairs together to make four "point" units.

Now you can sew those pairs together to make four “point” units.

Now you can sew the points together to complete your "All Points" block.

Then sew the points together to complete your “All Points” block.

 

2. “Rocky Mountain” (8″ block)

For this block you need ten matching HSTs, plus two 2.5" white squares and one 4.5" print square. This block is a good choice for "fussy cut" 4.5" squares.

For this block you need ten matching HSTs, plus two 2.5″ white squares and one 4.5″ print square. This block is a good choice for “fussy cut” 4.5″ squares.

Sew two strips with three HST's and one white square. Notice that the HSTs "point" to the right.  Sew two pairs of HSTs. Notice that the pairs "point" to the left.

Sew two strips with three HST’s and one white square. Notice that the HSTs “point” to the right. Sew two pairs of HSTs. Notice that the pairs “point” to the left.

Sew the HST pairs to the left and right sides of the 4.5" square.

Sew the HST pairs to the left and right sides of the 4.5″ square.

Now sew the strips to the top and bottom to complete your "Rocky Mountain" block.

Now sew the strips to the top and bottom to complete your “Rocky Mountain” block.

Remember- Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks, Vol. 9 hits newsstands on May 6th, and includes a brand new totally TQable block.

Watch this blog for a sneak peak sometime during the week of April 28th!

Categories: 8" TQ Blocks, HST's, Thrifty Quilter Blocks & Patterns | 1 Comment

The Alberta Clipper

We’re bracing for another winter storm on Montana’s Hi-Line today. Looks like an Alberta Clipper, a fast-moving cold front, is headed our direction. The wind is shifting from the southwest to the northwest and the temperature has dropped from 46 degrees (f) to 29 already. By tomorrow night, we should be below zero.

I keep reminding myself it’s going to be much colder and snowier farther east.

A member of my Facebook group, Thrifty Quilters, has pointed out that one of the blocks pictured in my Base 4 Sampler quilt on Page 16 of my book, The Thrifty Quilter: Make (Nearly) Free Quilts from Leftover Fabricdidn’t actually make it into the book. Oops. So for her, and for you, here is the Alberta Clipper block:

To make an 8″ finished block, all of your squares will be 2.5″, and your rectangles are cut 2.5″ x 4.5″. For a 12″ finished block, use 3.5″ squares and 3.5″ x 6.5″ rectangles.

GE DIGITAL CAMERATo make one Alberta Clipper block, you will need:

4 background squares (white)

4 light squares (blue)

4 medium-light squares (green)

8 medium squares (orange)

4 dark rectangles (purple)

GE DIGITAL CAMERAStep 1: use the four background (white) squares and four of the medium (orange) squares to make four half-square triangles (HSTs). Draw a diagonal line on the back of the lighter squares and sew on that line, then trim 1/4″ to one side of that seam.

GE DIGITAL CAMERAStep 2: Sew the HSTs to the medium-light (green) squares. Be sure that they look just like the photo, with the darker triangle on the lower left and the background triangle on the upper right. Set these four units aside.

GE DIGITAL CAMERAStep 3, use the same technique to put a medium (orange) corner on the lower right of your dark (purple) rectangles.

GE DIGITAL CAMERAStep 4: Now add the light (blue) corners to the upper left of your rectangles.

GE DIGITAL CAMERAStep 5: Now you can sew the two units into a quarter-section. Make four of these.

GE DIGITAL CAMERAStep 6: Sew the four quarter-sections together with the light (blue) corners in the center to complete your Alberta Clipper block.

TQ-_Square_Sampler.148163441_largeI don’t happen to have a copy of the Base 4 Sampler photo from the book, but I also used the Alberta Clipper (center top) in this workshop sampler that mixes Base 3, Base 4 and  Base 6 blocks.

Categories: 12" TQ Blocks, 8" TQ Blocks, HST's, Scrap Quilts, Thrifty Quilter Blocks & Patterns, TQ Patterns | 2 Comments

Getting to the (Star)Point

Necessity truly is the mother of invention.

The other day I was playing with a Thrifty Quilter (TQ) pattern idea using a variation of the Sawtooth Star. This block requires eight 2.5″ squares for the star points. Unfortunately, I didn’t have very many sets of eight matching squares left in my 2.5″ bin.

Now, my self-imposed rule is that I can only buy one fabric for any TQ quilt I make, and for this one, that fabric was for the setting triangles and binding. What to do?

I thought about cutting up a few fat quarters that I had been saving for some project I haven’t thought of yet. That’s how stashes get out of hand, by the way. “Oh, I can’t use that piece. I’m saving that for a special project” is just one of the excuses I’ve used to justify a trip to the fabric store for “just a little bit” of the “right” color. Of course, I never take the fabric I’m trying to match along, so I come home with several “little bits” in various shades. Hence, my one-fabric rule. Okay, back to the point.

I happened to come across a small stack of 6″ squares left over from a guild exchange. Then I remembered my bin of 6.5″ TQ pieces.

A-ha!

In the Thrifty Quilter book, we use flying geese units for the  star points. I can only cut four 2.5″ squares from a 6″ or 6.5″ square, which would leave me four squares short. However, I can make eight half-square triangles (HSTs) from two 6″ or 6.5″ squares. Here’s how:

GE DIGITAL CAMERAStep 1: Pair  light and  dark 6″ or 6.5″ squares, right sides together. Draw two diagonal lines on the back of the lighter square and sew 1/4″ on each side of both lines.

GE DIGITAL CAMERACut the square in half vertically, and horizontally. Note: The photos show a 6″ square being cut into 3″ squares. If you start with 6.5″ squares, you would cut them into 3.25″ squares.

GE DIGITAL CAMERANow cut each of the small squares on the drawn diagonal line. I like to press my seams open. You can press to the darker fabric if you want to.

GE DIGITAL CAMERABecause these HST’s are larger than we need, we will trim them down to 2.5″. We did this in the “Overflowing Scrap Basket” blog post. Click HERE to go to that post.

GE DIGITAL CAMERANow we can sew pairs of these HST’s together to make the four flying geese units we need for the sawtooth stars!

GE DIGITAL CAMERATo complete each block, you will need a 4.5″ square for the center, and four more HST’s for the corners. Notice I have four HST’s leftover from this second pair of 6″ squares.

GE DIGITAL CAMERAThose four HST’s went into a second block!

So two 4.5″ squares and six 6″ (or 6.5″) squares will give me two 8″ star blocks.

The quilt I have in mind for these blocks will require 32 blocks for a crib-size quilt. You would need 59 blocks for a generous throw-size quilt – with a border it could be twin-size.

—————————————————–

Here are two more ways to make 2.5″ HST’s from TQ pieces:

GE DIGITAL CAMERAIf you need just a couple of matching HST’s, you can pair two 2.5″ x 4.5″ rectangles. Draw a diagonal line from the top left corner to a point 2.5″ in from the left on the bottom edge. Flip the piece around and repeat. Sew on these diagonal lines and trim 1/4″ from the seams. This gives you two matching HST’s.

GE DIGITAL CAMERANeed four matching HST’s? Cut two 3″ squares from two 3.5″ x 6.5″ rectangles. Draw a diagonal line on the back of the lighter squares, sew 1/4″ from the lines and trim on the lines. Now you can trim these HST’s down to 2.5″.

If you haven’t already done so, I invite you to join the Thrifty Quilter group on Facebook, and “Like” my Facebook page, Sweetgrass Creative Designs.

Categories: 8" TQ Blocks, HST's, Thrifty Quilter Blocks & Patterns, TQ Patterns | 3 Comments

My Tulip Garden

It’s been just over a month since I posted the tutorial for a tulip block made from Thrifty Quilter pieces. (click HERE to re-read that post.) Today seems like a good time to plant My Tulip Garden:

"My Tulip Garden" was my answer to my quilt guild's 5" charm square challenge a few years ago, however, it can also be made with Thrifty Quilter pieces. "My Tulip Garden" by Anne Wiens, 2011

“My Tulip Garden”
by Anne Wiens, 2011

This quilt, which measures 44″ x 60″. was designed and made for my quilt guild’s 5″ charm square challenge a couple of years ago, however, I keep it in my Thrifty Quilter (TQ) collection because those 5″ squares were trimmed down to 2.5″ squares, 4.5″ squares and 2.5″ x 4.5″ rectangles.

Here are the materials required to make this quilt:

1.5 yards white fabric for background:

Cut six 4.5″ x width-of-fabric (WOF) strips and cut eight 4.5″ squares from each strip.

Cut three 2.5″ x WOF strips and cut sixteen 2.5″ squares from each.

Cut one 1.5″ x WOF strip and cut into eight 1.5″ squares and eight 1.5″ x 2.5″.

Cut six 2.5″ x WOF strips and set aside for borders.

Scraps:

110 assorted 4.5″ squares

Eight 5″ squares for tulips – cut each square into three 2.5″ squares and one 1.5″ square.

Eight green 5″ squares for leaves – cut each into two 2.5″ x 4.5″ rectangles.

Sixteen assorted 5″ squares – Cut one 2.5″ square and one 2.5″ x 4.5″ rectangle from each.

Construction:

First you will need to make eight Tulip blocks, following the instructions I gave you in a previous post. (See the link above.)

Make 8 Tulip blocks

Make 8 Tulip blocks

Use 42 of your 4.5″ scrap squares and 42 of the 4.5″ white squares to make 4.5″ Half Square Triangles (HST’s). Don’t toss the cutaway triangles. We’ll use those in another project.

Make six blocks that have four Half-Square Triangles (HST's).

Make six blocks that have four Half-Square Triangles (HST’s).

Make six blocks that have three HST's and one 4.5" white square.

Make six blocks that have three HST’s and one 4.5″ white square.

Make 15  4-Patch blocks.

Make 15 4-Patch blocks.

You should have a total of 35 blocks. Lay them out in seven rows with five blocks per row, like this:

Layout for My Tulip Garden.

Layout for My Tulip Garden.

Sew the blocks into rows, then sew the rows together. Measure the length of your top and use the white 2.5″ x WOF strips  to piece two border strips of this length (it should be about 56.5″ long). Sew to the sides of the piece. Measure the width, including the side borders (should be about 44.5″) and make your top and bottom borders.

The backing for this quilt should be about 48″ x 64″ and the batting should be about the same size.

Layer your top, batting and backing and quilt as desired.

In the next blog, I’ll show you how to make the flanged binding I used for My Tulip Garden.

Categories: 8" TQ Blocks, HST's, Quilts, Thrifty Quilter Blocks & Patterns | 2 Comments

Thinking of (Next) Spring

I love tulips.

It seems so optimistic to plant tulip bulbs in the face of an oncoming winter as if to remind ourselves that as cold and snowy as the next few months might be, spring is waiting on the other side.

Today I’d like to share a tulip block that I used in a quilt I made a couple of years ago for my guild’s Charm Square Challenge. A Charm Square is 5″ x 5″. As it happens, this block, and the quilt I’ll show you in the next blog, can also be made with Thrifty Quilter pieces.

The tulip block has four sections – the flower, two leaf sections, and a square.

Let’s begin with the flower section:

GE DIGITAL CAMERAStep 1: sew a 1.5″ colored  to a 1.5″ white square, then add a 1.5″ x 2.5″ rectangle.

GE DIGITAL CAMERAStep 2: You will also need two 2.5″ colored & white half-square triangles, and one 2.5″ colored square. Lay the pieces out as shown and sew together to make a tulip flower. Set aside.

GE DIGITAL CAMERAStep 3: You will need to make two leaf sections. For each one you need one 2.5″ x 4.5″ green rectangle and two 2.5″ white squares. You also need two matching pieces, one a 2.5″ square and the other a 2.5″ x 4.5″ rectangle.

GE DIGITAL CAMERAStep 4: Use the “sew and flip” method to make the units shown. Notice that the triangle slant “upward” in the purple units and “downward” in the red units.  Sew the center seams to complete these units.

GE DIGITAL CAMERAStep 5: Lay the flower section, the leaf sections and a 4.5″ square out as shown and sew together to complete your tulip block.

Next time I will show you the quilt I made with these tulip blocks. To make your own, you will need eight tulip blocks.

GE DIGITAL CAMERAYou will also need fifteen 4-patch blocks made with 4.5″ squares.

My quilt is 44″ x 60″.

To make it, you need:

3 yards white for backgrounds. Cut 48 2.5″ squares, 8 1.5″ squares, 8 1.5″ x 2.5″ rectangles, 48 4.5″ squares (or 21 5″ squares & 6 4.5″ squares), 5 2.5″ x width of fabric strips for borders.

Scraps: 2 sets of 5 2.5″ squares for flowers, 8 pairs of 2.5″ x 4.5″ green rectangles for leaves, 16 sets of matching 2.5″ squares and 2.5″ x 4.5″ rectangles for the tulip blocks, 60 4.5″ assorted 4.5″ squares for 4-patches. Your will also need 42 more assorted 4.5″ squares or 21 assorted 5″ squares for half-square triangle blocks, which we will make next time.

Categories: 8" TQ Blocks, HST's, Quilts, Scrap Quilts, Thrifty Quilter Blocks & Patterns | 1 Comment

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