Monthly Archives: December 2018

Simplify. Simplify. Simplify!

Cozy-CabinsThe November challenge for the Island Batik Ambassadors was to use a log cabin block as the focus of our designs. If you look through the blog links at the bottom of the page, you’ll be amazed at the creativity displayed by this group.

IMG_2820My own quilt began with a fairly grand and highly ambitious design, one my Mother would have loved, because the Log Cabin was her favorite quilt pattern. As it became clear I wouldn’t have it finished by the end of the year, and certainly not by the end of the month, I began to rework the pattern, simplifying the Log Cabin blocks with each revision until it wound up as Moonflower Cottage.  The original featured 8″ blocks. Curved Log Cabin blocks surrounded and were surrounded by my own “Morning Glory” blocks.  In the end, I enlarged the 8″ blocks to 12″, so there are far fewer blocks required, and the center blocks are merely a nod to the Log Cabin.

The fabrics for Moonflower Cottage are from Island Batik‘s “Vintage Morris” collection. They sent me a 42-piece Strip Pack, and two coordinates. I added a peachy orange, and a light green from the same collection for the flower blocks, and one of their off-white basics for the background.

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Make 10 Moonflower blocks

My 12″ (finished) “Moonflower” blocks are made with 3.5″ x 6.5″ split rectangle units. The easiest way to make these is with the Split Rects tool from Studio 180 Design. This is one of those tools you don’t realize you need until you have it. (No affiliation, just an avid devotee.)

The other pieces in the block are three off-white 3.5″ squares, one 3.5″ x 6.5″ rectangle; one 3.5″ yellow square, and one 3.5″ green and off-white half-square triangle.

 

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Make 6 Mock Log Cabin blocks

 

My “Mock Log Cabin” blocks are made with one 2.5″ square, and one each 2.5″ x 4.5″, 2.5″ x 6.5″, 2.5″ x 8.5″, 2.5″ x 10.5″ and 2.5″ x 12.5″ pieces, cut from the strip pack. The background is two 2.5″ squares and two 2.5″ x 4.5″ rectangles. There is also a 6.5″ background square with a blue corner added via the Stitch-and-Flip method.

There is also one block that is six 2.5″ x 12.5″ strips sewn into a square.

 

 

 

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Make 14 setting triangles

The setting triangles are made with one 6.5″ and two 3.5″ background squares. The blue triangles are made by cutting a 6″ square diagonally twice, and sewing the triangles to the sides of the smaller squares.

Note: Traditionally, those blue triangles would be cut from a 5.5″ square. Making my triangles just a little oversize gives me a wider seam allowance on the outside edge, making it less likely that I will nip a white point when adding my binding.

 

To lay out the quilt, begin by laying down the center square, then building from the center out:

Sew into diagonal rows, then sew the rows together to complete your quilt top.

Moonflower Cottage - TitleMy Moonflower Cottage quilt measures about 52″ x 68″, and was quilted by Kathy Brown with Hobbs Heirloom batting and Aurifil thread, both provided by the companies.

So that’s how I met the “Cozy Cabins” challenge. Wait ’til you see what my fellow Island Batik Ambassadors did!

 

Categories: Aurifil Threads, Hobbs Batting, Island Batik Ambassador, Island Batik Fabric, Quilts, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

A Rocky Mountain Christmas

It’s Day 20 of the Moda Bake Shop’s 2018 Countdown to Christmas, and if you’ve been following along on the blog, you now have 19 new block patterns in your Christmas collection, in both 12″ and 6″ finished sizes! Block #20, my second contribution to the fun is a slight variation on the traditional Rocky Mountain block. Normally this block would have a light background and dark “mountain peaks.” But it’s winter, and this time of year, those peaks are usually snow-capped. Hence, a “Rocky Mountain Christmas!”

The “recipe” for the block is on today’s Moda Bake Shop blog.

Here, I’ll give you a quick tablerunner idea that uses one 12.5″ (unfinished) and two 6.5″ blocks to make an 18″ x 35″ tablerunner. It would fit smaller kitchen tables, or your coffee table.

TR Complete

Here are the fabric requirements and cutting instructions:

Chart

 

Step 1: Make one 12 1/2″ Rocky Mountain Christmas blocks and two 6 1/2″ blocks, following the instructions on the Moda Bake Shop blog. substitute the 6 1/2″ and 3 1/2″ green squares for the red and white print squares in the center of the blocks.

HSTs

Step 2: Cut the 6 7/8″ green and white squares diagonally, and sew into four half square triangles (HSTs.)

QSTStep 3: Cut the 9 3/4″ white square diagonally twice to yield four triangles.

 

Green w White

Sew the white triangles to the HSTs. Note the placement of the white triangles.

Sections

Step 5: Sew the green and white units to the Rocky Mountain Christmas blocks as shown, then sew the rows together to complete your tablerunner top.

Step 6: Layer top batting and backing. Quilt as desired and bind with the white strips.

How easy is that? If your Christmas gift shopping and wrapping are complete, you may still have time to whip up this runner before Christmas!

I hope you’re enjoying the Moda Bake Shop Countdown to Christmas. If you need  inspiration and encouragement to complete your Countdown blocks, join the Moda Bake Shop Bakers group on Facebook!

Merry Christmas from Montana!

“Chef” Anne

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: FQ Projects, Moda Bake Shop, Tablerunners, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Touchdown!

IMG_2289Sometimes designing a quilt is like coaching a football team. The coach has to design a set of plays that will allow his players to combine their skills in such a way that they move the ball from point A to the end zone. Island Batik Ambassadors are given a selection of fabrics and a goal…turn that collection into a finished quilt that meets the monthly challenge theme. I think I have a winner for the Secondary Pattern challenge.

30742545_2036742299701753_6798327948416909312_nI decided to use the Northern Woods Stack (42 10″ squares) that Island Batik provided me. I added a nice little off-white print for the background, a copper batik for the border, and a deep green batik for the corner triangles, which turn into my secondary design.

Since I did not want a standard grid setting for the blocks, I decided to make one big 24″ block and eight 12″ blocks.

IMG_2459The “Flea Flicker” block begins with an 8.5″ (unfinished) Double Pinwheel block. Then I add a 2.5″ x 10.5″ strip to each side. This requires a partial seam technique.

 

 

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The strips that go around the block are made by sewing a 2.5″ square that matches the small pinwheel to the lower right corner of a 2.5″ x 6.5″ strip of the background fabric, using the stitch-and-flip method to make those squares into triangles. Then sew a 2.5″ x 4.5″ strip of the background fabric to the triangle.

The strip shown here has a dark green upper right corner added to the 2.5″ x 4.5″ strip. two of your 12″ blocks will have those dark green corners all the way around. The other six blocks will have green corners on two sides, and blank corners on the other two sides.

Here’s that partial seam thing. It’s easier done than explained.

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Sew the first strip to the block (the strip is longer than the pinwheel is wide.) Stop sewing and back-stitch just beyond the small triangle. We will finish this seam later.

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With the addition of that first strip, the top end of the pinwheel block is now 10.5″ wide, so we can sew the next strip on all the way. Now the left side of the pinwheel block is 10.5″ wide.

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So now we can sew a strip to that third side. (Did you notice that I rotated the pinwheel block in the photo? The strip we just added is at the top.) Now the fourth side of the pinwheel is 10.5″ wide.

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Sew a 10.5″ strip to the fourth side of the block (I rotated it again.)  And now we can deal with that loose end we left hanging on the first side.

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Now we can finish that partial seam. I start stitching so that I overlap my stitching by about a half-inch, and sew to the edge of the block.

I made one 24″ block using the same processes, but with larger pieces. Then it was time to put it all together.

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The six 12″ blocks with only two green corners were sewn into pairs, with the green corners on the outside of the pairs

The blocks are then sewn together with 2.5″ wide sashing strips. I think you can see in this photo that there is actually a sashing strip on the outside of all of the blocks. The wide copper border is made of large rectangles, with two green corners on each.

 

 

IMG_2815There are green “cornerstones” at the intersections of the sashing strips. The resulting secondary design is a traditional quilt block design called “Shoo Fly.”  That, and the fact that I thought the fabrics gave this quilt a kind of masculine character, and the fact that it’s football season, made the name “Flea Flicker” a natural choice for this quilt.

Flea Flicker was quilted by Kathy Brown.

Thank you to Island Batik for providing the fabrics, Aurifil for their wonderful cotton threads, and Hobbs for the Warm and Natural batting!

Flea Flicker - Title

If you’d like to see what my fellow Island Batik Ambassadors are up to (Trust me, you do,) check their blogs:

Categories: 10" Squares, Aurifil Threads, Hobbs Batting, Island Batik Ambassador, Island Batik Fabric, Uncategorized | 3 Comments

A Prairie Christmas Star

Today is Day 3 of the 2018 Moda Bake Shop Countdown to Christmas, and the block I shared on the Moda Bake Shop blog is called “A Prairie Christmas Star.” This year our blocks are presented in 12″ and 6″ finished sizes, and at the end of the month, we’ll give you a couple of setting options for a sampler quilt.

PCS- TitleFor purposes of the series, Moda Fabrics provided us with fat quarters of solid red and white fabrics, and red and white print fabrics.

My block uses all three, and I presented the pattern as shown above, but I thought for the Seams Like a Plan blog, we’d play with placements…colors within the block, and then a couple of quilt layouts.

Each set of three fat quarters (one red solid, one white solid and one red/white print) will easily give you enough pieces to make three 12″ blocks. Layer the three fat quarters and cut the same pieces from each one. Here’s the cutting layout I used:

PCS-FQ Cuts

This gives you enough parts and pieces for three blocks, if you rotate the placement of the three colors within the block. Because you can make six possible combinations of the three colors, there are two “rotations” you can choose from:

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I don’t know about you, but I would love to lock myself in the studio with a pile of FQs for a day and make a quilt’s worth of Prairie Christmas Star blocks! But what do you do with a pile of blocks? Well, here are a couple of quilt layouts, shown in “exploded” drawings so you can see how they would be constructed:

First, a 68″ x 84″ twin size quilt. It would take 25 large blocks and 40 small blocks, plus 4″ (finished width) borders on the left and right sides.

PCS-Twin Setting

 

And here’s a 92″ x 96″ queen size quilt. It would take 48 large blocks and 32 small blocks, plus a 4″ (finished) border on the right and left sides.

PCS-Queen Setting

Again, there is no sashing between the rows of blocks. The blocks are sewn into rows as shown, then the rows sewn together.

If you’re interested in a throw size quilt, start making those Prairie Christmas Star blocks according to the instructions on today’s Moda Bake Shop blog. You’ll need a total of 18 large blocks and 36 small blocks for a 54″ x 72″ throw quilt. The quilt layout will be shown on December 26.

Be sure to check the Moda Bake Shop blog every day this month for another sampler block pattern. I’ll share “A Rocky Mountain Christmas” on December 20th.

Merry Christmas!

Anne

 

Categories: FQ Projects, Moda Bake Shop, Other Blocks & Patterns, Quilts, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

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